The evils of capitalism as described in the jungle by upton sinclair

The Immigrant Experience and Disillusionment Themes and Colors LitCharts assigns a color and icon to each theme in The Jungle, which you can use to track the themes throughout the work.

The evils of capitalism as described in the jungle by upton sinclair

Expert Answers

The basic premise argues for the nationalization of natural resources and utilities while calling for state ownership and distribution of wealth.

Most important, socialism wants to create a global, classless cooperative of all people. Originally, the terms socialism and communism were used interchangeably. However, communism is an extreme form of socialism that advocates the entire elimination of capitalism.

Many communists continue to use the term socialist even though socialists distance themselves from what they call "authoritarian tyranny. The worsening conditions of the proletariat, or working class, during the close of the nineteenth century led to the modern socialist movement.

When the predicted violent revolution did not occur, many socialists began to reject the need for violence as a means for achieving their goals. This ideological shift separated the socialists from the Marxists communists.

The German writer Eduard Bernstein wrote about the basic beliefs of attaining socialist goals through reformist, parliamentary, and evolutionary methods rather than through revolution.

Although most readers did not realize it, his beliefs actually embraced the American dream. In fact, what Sinclair wanted was a return to the original idea that inspired immigrants and freedom-seekers — a return to the original American dream.

In one of his most famous passages, he writes, "Passionately, more than words can utter, I love this land of mine. There never was any land like it — there may never be any like it again; and Freedom watches from her mountains, trembling.

The evils of capitalism as described in the jungle by upton sinclair

Sinclair based his attack on capitalism on his belief that capitalism violated essential American values. Sinclair believed that socialism was the means for American liberals to achieve most fully the ideals they embraced. Sinclair abhorred the exploitation of the working class and economic inequality.

SparkNotes: The Jungle: Themes

He thought that America should be the land of opportunity for all people, provided they were willing to work. A strong work ethic was imperative. Or when an entire family is working but not succeeding, that too is a problem. For Sinclair, the ideals of America stressed equality and brotherhood, but in all actuality, the rich did indeed get richer and the poor got poorer.

Too many people are unable to separate a political system from an economic system. Moreover, the United States, unlike many European counterparts, never had an overwhelmingly successful socialist movement, so Sinclair is remembered as a muckraker, not a socialist.Communism, Capitalism, and Democracy in China speeches to express his own views about workers voting for socialist candidates to take over the government and end the evils of capitalist greed and "wage slavery." The Jungle by Upton Sinclair.

Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, Socialism versus Capitalism in The Jungle by Upton Sinclair Even before the beginning of the twentieth century, the debate between socialists and capitalists has raged. In The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair, he portrays capitalism as the cause of all evils in society.

- Socialism versus Capitalism in The Jungle by Upton Sinclair Even before the beginning of the twentieth century, the debate between socialists and capitalists has raged.

From the SparkNotes Blog

In The Jungle, by Upton Sinclair, he portrays capitalism as the cause of all evils in society. Upton Sinclair's novel 'The Jungle' explores the evils of capitalism in order to promote the cause of socialism.

The labor force is being abused.

The evils of capitalism as described in the jungle by upton sinclair

Sinclair presents these conditions as a horrible situation for the modest, moral Ona but also offers an explanation in which the system of prostitution is examined in rough economic terms. The Jungle's central theme throughout the entire book is that capitalism is evil.

Sinclair uses specific examples in the life of an immigrant family to show how capitalism is bad. Jurgis, the hard-working family man, obtains a job in a packing house and the working conditions and policies of the company are shown to be deceitfut, dangerous, unfair, and unjust.

SparkNotes: The Jungle: Themes